11 Benefits of Parsley

11 Benefits of Parsley

Now, I don’t know about you but when I was younger, parsley was something that was put in a sauce or popped on top of a piece of fish. It was like this herb that only seemed to have one use, and that was to decorate a piece of white fish. I never ate it. To be fair, I never ate any greenery that was on my plate. This last year has taught me so much about myself and the world around us. One of my current interests is herbs. I want to learn about them, their history and their uses. Now, my dad had gifted me a plant which I thought was coriander. I actually added it to my curry the other day. It was only the following day when I realised it was actually parsley, rookie error.

I chopped some of the stems and leaves off to hang in my wardrobe to dry and wondered what else I could do with it. I discovered that you can actually make a tea with it, and this tea has many benefits. I have also been weaning myself off the herbal teas, complete with teabags, for a more natural loose leaf tea as they have so much more flavour.

Parsley ( Petroselinum Crispum) has a chequered history, if a herb can. The Jews associated this herb with rebirth and springtime, whereas the Ancient Romans connected it with death or evil. I’m going with the former. The Ancient Greeks held the plant sacred and never placed it on their table. Parsley is rich in polyphenols, flavonoids and other antioxidants. It contains folic acid, vitamins A, C and K.

Apparently dried parsley has 17 times more antioxidants than fresh parsley, so get picking, drying & sprinkling on your food. To dry your parsley you can hang it in a dark space, away from an oven. I use my kids wardrobe to hang my herbs. Leave them approximately a week. I then normally put them in my blender to crush, or you can use a pestle and mortar.

Benefits of parsley

Aids digestion

Reduces flatulence and bloating

Supports your immune system & can help prevent cell damage

Supports bone health, packed full of Vitamin K which is an essential nutrient for bone health.

Rich in antioxidants and vitamin C which reduces stress in your body and may lower your risk of certain cancers

May improve blood sugar

According to a 2017 study in the journal Geroscience, apigenin, a natural substance in parsley shows promise as a non-toxic treatment for human breast cancer.

Can help soothe inflammation, so can be good for arthritis

Can benefit your complexion as high in vitamin C

Can freshen your breath by chewing some leaves

Can also help with eye health

Uses

You can add a few sprigs to your salad, to soups and stews or even smoothies if you fancy giving that a try. I often put nettle seeds in mine. You can also make parsley tea. Using a tea pot or diffuser pop a few leaves and allow to sit for approximately ten minutes. Then drink. Super easy and so many benefits! Great for indigestion, kidney stones and constipation. I quite like the taste of it but you can always add a bit of honey or agave nectar if you feel drawn to.

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